Guide to Shipping Containers

Shipping Containers are the cargo containers that allow goods to be stored for transport in trucks, trains and boats, making intermodal transport possible.  They are typically used to transport heavy materials or palletized goods.  Shipping Containers are used to protect transported cargo from shock and bad weather conditions, as well as keep storage products intact. They were first used in the 1950s and were initially developed for the purpose of commercial shipping.

Shipping containers are also referred to as, ISO container, conex box, railroad container, intermodal container and certain truck trailers. This industry term refers to the International Standards Organization (ISO), the largest developer of international standards and the organization that developed the standard dimension specifications for steel shipping containers used worldwide.

The design of the ISO standard containers allows for intermodal shipping, which is the movement of containers from one mode of transport to another, like ship, rail, or truck, without the need of having to load and unload, and reload its contents.

Shipping Containers is used to protect transported cargo from shock and bad weather conditions, as well as keep storage products intact. They were first used in the 1950s and were initially developed for the purpose of commercial shipping container transport.

Depending on the type of product that is going to be sent, the Shipping Container can vary in dimension, structure, material, etc. Characteristics of these shipping containers were later standardized, something that expedited transport without the need to load and unload the merchandise along the way.

There are different types of Shipping Containers for different types of transportation:

Common Types of Shipping Containers

Shipping Containers are another name for the conex boxes most used on the market.  Shipping Containers are typically suitable for any type of dry cargo: pallets, boxes, bags, machines, furniture, etc.

Common types include:

  • Dry Storage Container
  • Refrigerated Container
  • Open top container
  • Flat rack container
  • Open Side Container
  • Tanks Container
  • Ventilated containers
  • Dry Storage Shipping Container

Dry Storage Shipping Containers are your typical standard shipping containers.  Basic construction is made of steel, and hermetically sealed, without cooling or ventilation.  Sizes typically come in 20 ‘, 40’ or 40 ‘High Cube.  The High Cube category facilitates an increase of 13% of the internal cubic capacity and can handle the heaviest loads (coal, tobacco, etc.)

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Refrigerated Shipping Container

Reefer Shipping Containers provide a temperature controlled environment. They have a power supply that connects to energy sources during transport. This allows the products to be transported at a constant temperature throughout the journey. They have the possibility to lower temperature from -18 ° to 30 °.  There are 20 and 40 foot models, in addition to the High Cube.

This type of Shipping Container is especially recommended for transporting food or products that need a low storage temperature.

Open Top Shipping Container

Open Top Shipping Container have the same measurements as the standard containers, but are open at the top because they have a removable canvas roof.  These containers facilitate the transport of bulky loads.

Flat Rack Shipping Container

Flat Rack Shipping Containers are like the Open Top, but also lack side walls and even, in some cases, front and rear walls. They are used for atypical loads and pay supplements in the same way as Open Top.

Open Side Shipping Container

Open Side Shipping Containers have the same measurements as standard containers; 20 or 40 feet, with the difference that they have a side opening. This allows for transporting very long merchandise, whose dimensions prevent it from being loaded by the back door.

Tank Shipping Container

Tank Shipping Containers are used for the liquid transport and made to carry dangerous as toxic, corrosive, highly combustible chemicals, as well as oil, milk, beers, wine, mineral water, etc. They have the same dimensions as a Dry Shipping Containers, but their structure is different, as they include a polyethylene tank inside.

Ventilated Shipping Containers

Ventilated Shipping Containers are made for transporting products such as coffee or cocoa beans, which must be ventilated in transit; sometimes these units are called “coffee containers”.

Shipping Container Door Diagram and Troubleshooting

Now we are going to run through the essential parts of a shipping container.

  • For a door to work, you need hinges. Pins hold the shipping container’s hinges together through a barrel.  In certain cases when doors are difficult to open, hinge pins and blades may be seized due to corrosion.  Each door is fitted with 2 to 4 vertical lock rods to enable opening, closing and locking of the doors.
  • The door handle rotates the lockbar to initiate the door opening process by forcing the cams out of their keepers. Each door handle has a door locking handle retainer that slides over the door handle when in locked position.
  • At the end of each lock rod is a cam welded in place which engages with knuckles, also known as cam keepers. The action of engaging the cams to the keepers forms an anti-racking function.  In certain cases, often unfortunately too many, contents of the shipping container may have shifted causing shipping container doors and lockrods to warp. 
  • When opening a shipping container, start with the right hand door first. Swivel the handles, engage the cams and keepers, and twist both door handles.  Closing the doors is just a reverse of this process.
  • The lock box is a steel box welded to the right hand door which overlaps a staple welded to the left hand door. A padlock, normally CISA type 285 66 can then be attached inside the lock box through the staple and is then protected from direct attack, hindering attempts to gain entry to the container.
  • ISO markings and a consolidated data plate allow worldwide intermodal transport and are updated as necessary. Take note that customs authorities in some countries may also have their own container seal regulations as part of their national security.
  • Rubber gaskets are fitted to the container doors during the manufacturing process and prevent water ingress. Door gaskets are designed to present two or more fins against the structure or adjacent door. These are generally flexible but when the gasket is damaged, they may become stiff thus jamming the door closed, or preventing it from being closed.
  1. Doors

Two door leaves are fabricated from two vertical rolled hollow sections and 2 horizontal c section members. The frame is infilled with corrugated steel paneling.

These are normally attached to the rear corner posts each with four drop forged steel hinge blades. The blades allow 270 degree opening which allow the doors to swing back against the container side wall.

(Cargo may shift during transit. Look at the container to make sure that the doors are aligned and level, both top and bottom.  In cases where the container frame is racked and the door gear will not operate correctly.)

  1. Lockbox

The lock box is a steel box welded to the right hand door which overlaps a staple welded to the left hand door. A padlock, normally type CISA type 285 66 can then be attached inside the lock box through the staple and is then protected from direct attack, hindering attempts to gain entry to the container.

  1. Lockrods, cam keepers, handles

Each door is fitted with 2-4 vertical lock rods to enable opening, closing and locking of the doors.

At the end of each lock rod (top and bottom) is a cam welded in place which engages with knuckles, also known as cam keepers.

The action of engaging the cams to the keepers forms an anti-racking function.

(In certain cases, often unfortunately too many, contents of the shipping container may have shifted, or containers even dropped, causing shipping container doors and lockrods to warp)

The door handle rotates the lockbar to initiates the door opening process by forcing the cams out of their keepers.  Each door handle has a door locking handle retainer that slides over the door handle when in locked position.

  1. Rubber gaskets

Rubber gaskets are fitted to the container doors during the manufacturing process and prevent water ingress.

(Door gaskets are designed to present two or more fins against the structure or adjacent door. These are generally flexible but when the gasket is damaged, they may become hard or blocked thus jamming the door closed, or preventing it being closed.)

  1. ISO markings and CSC plate

ISO markings and a consolidated data plate allow worldwide intermodal transport when left in place and updated as necessary.

  1. Hinge pins

Of course for a door to work, you need hinges.

(In certain cases when doors are difficult to open, hinge pins and blade are seized due to corrosion.)

Choosing the Right Company for Buying a Shipping Container

When doing research in finding the right Shipping Container, follow some of these tips:

Research Online

Choose which companies have a good track record of excellence and reputation.  Read reviews and what other customers have to say.

Check for Availability

If you are shipping from various locations, check for availability if containers can be delivered to your required areas.

Check for Best Pricing

If money matters, you can find used container resellers online that might be able to offer half the price on used containers.

Check for Good Customer Service

If you plan to order often, you might want to check for good customer service.  Ask potential container companies a question through email or their online customer service. See how fast they respond.

Check for Warranty

Check with companies to see if they offer any warranties or buy back or trade in plans.

There are millions of Shipping Containers in use around the world, and a lucky few get a second life as repurposed shipping container structures. While they look a bit plain and boxy to the untrained eye, shipping containers play a critical role in our lives, whether embarking on ocean crossings to deliver the goods we use every day or venturing into a second life as a container structure.

Here are Some Fascinating Facts about Shipping Containers

  • Shipping Containers can be safely stacked nine-high.
  • Well-maintained Shipping Containers hold 759, of their original value for 25+ years.
  • There are over 37 million Shipping Containers in use around the world.
  • A Shipping Container floor can hold up 55,000 lb. of goods without warping.
  • Shipping Container flooring is made of 1-1/8” marine grade plywood.
  • Most Shipping Containers are 20 feet or 40-feet long.
  • Shipping Containers are made of 16-gauge corten steel.
  • Common container modifications include: personnel doors, windows flooring, shelving, work stations, insulation, climate control & even restrooms.

Fun Ways to Use Shipping Containers

Shipping Containers are not just used for cargo these days. There are many innovative and imaginative uses you may like to consider.

Here are few ideas of how shipping containers have been used for modern, cost effective buildings.

Homes

The trend to build cost-effective homes from recycled shipping containers started in USA and has reached Australia.

Art Galleries

Architect, Tomokaza Hayakawa designed an art gallery in Japan using two shipping containers stacked on each other.

Drive-Thru Coffee

Starbucks in Washington have used four old shipping containers to create an architect designed drive-thru store.

Cafes

A cafe in Footscray (Melbourne) called Rudimentary has been built using three 40-foot shipping containers.

Polar Stations

India has built a Polar Station in Antarctica using 134 shipping containers. They cover three floors and are well insulated for the weather conditions.

A well-maintained Shipping Container can hold 75% of their original value for 25+ years. Every day, container ships transport goods all over the world on the international seas.

Shipping Container Opening and Closing Tool

Shipping containers often take a beating, traveling around the world, being exposed to freezing conditions and rust due to seawater or when the frost has melted.

During the cold season, and in freezing parts of the world, our shipping container tool can benefit the opening and closing of frozen shipping container doors and hard to open or rusted containers.

Injuries often occur as a result of personnel trying to open and close difficult container doors, and often are the result of inappropriate techniques being used to open them.

To aid in opening and closing shipping container doors, we introduce OPNBar.

A Shipping Container (also known as Intermodal Container, ISO Container,Railroad Container, and certain Truck Trailers)  is a large standardized shipping container, designed and built for intermodal freight transport.   Shipping Containers can be used across different modes of transport.  They can go from ship to rail to truck, without unloading and reloading their cargo.

The metal doors on the shipping containers on these containers are standardized.  Shipping Containers use the same type and style of doors and locking bars, which our tool can be used.

Lengths are as follows: 20′, 40′, 45′, 48′, 50′, 53′. All these containers are globally used to transport cargo. The 53′ length is now, the new the standard length.

Here are some likely reasons a Shipping Container door will not open or close.  Visit https://www.shippingcontainertool.com/what-is-a-shipping-container/ to find out how to overcome some of these issues.

Doors and lockrods may warp or container frame is racked so that the door gear will not operate correctly. This may be caused by cargo shifting during transit. Look at the container to make sure that the doors are aligned and level, both top and bottom.

The hinge pins and blade are seized due to corrosion.

The door gasket has been damaged and is preventing opening. Door gaskets are designed to present two or more fins against the structure or adjacent door. These are generally flexible but when the gasket is damaged, they may become hard or blocked thus jamming the door closed, or preventing it being closed.

Water has become trapped between frozen shipping container doors, particularly relevant to refrigerated cargoes, or containers with moisture releasing cargoes in cold weather.

What is JTAG?

Introduction

JTAG is an integrated method for testing interconnects on printed circuit boards (PCBs) that are implemented at the integrated circuit (IC) level.  Since its introduction as an industry standard in 1990, JTAG has continuously grown in adoption, popularity, and usefulness—even today, new revisions and supplements to the IEEE Std.-1149.1 standard are being developed and implemented. This document is a brief introduction to the nature and history of JTAG, from its introduction to new extensions in current development.

JTAG Technology

JTAG is commonly referred to as boundary-scan and defined by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) 1149.1, which originally began as an integrated method for testing interconnects on printed circuit boards (PCBs) implemented at the integrated circuit (IC) level. As PCBs grew in complexity and density—a trend that continues today—limitations in the traditional test methods of in-circuit testers (ICTs) and bed of nails fixtures became evident. Packaging formats, specifically Ball Grid Array (BGA, depicted in Figure 1) and other fine pitch components, designed to meet ever-increasing physical space constraints, also led to a loss of physical access to signals.

These new technology developments led to dramatic increases in costs related to designing and building bed of nails fixtures; at the same time, circuit board test coverage also suffered. JTAG/boundary-scan presented an elegant solution to this problem: build functionality into the IC to assist in testing assembled electronic systems.

Today, JTAG is used for everything from testing interconnects and functionality on ICs to programming flash memory of systems deployed in the field and everything in-between. JTAG and its related standards have been and will continue to be extended to address additional challenges in electronic test and manufacturing, including test of 3D ICs and complex, hierarchical systems.

History of JTAG

In the 1980s, the Joint Test Action Group (JTAG) set out to develop a specification for boundary-scan testing that was standardized in 1990 as the IEEE Std. 1149.1-1990. A few years later in 1993, a new revision to the standard—1149.1a—was introduced to clarify, correct, and enhance the original specification. An additional supplement, 1149.1b, was published in 1994 to add Boundary-Scan Description Language (BSDL) to the standard, paving the way for fast, automated test development and spurring continuous adoption by major electronics producers all over the world. The lessons that were learned became formalized in an update to the core standard in 2001 and IEEE-1149.1-2001 was published.

As new applications of JTAG were discovered, new standards were developed to extend the capabilities of JTAG. Standards such as the IEEE-1149.5 module test and maintenance bus standard in 1995 and the IEEE-1149.4 standard for mixed-signal testing in 1999 were met with low adoption rates and are not widely used at present. The IEEE-1149.6 standard introduced in 2003, on the other hand, began with slow adoption but has since become standard in many ICs as the technology it addressed—high-speed, AC-coupled signals—became a common feature of electronic systems. IEEE-1149.7, published in 2009 to address the need for JTAG in low-pin-count systems, is now standard on many popular microcontrollers.

Additional standards have also been published to add specific test capabilities. In 2002, the IEEE-1532 standard for in-system configuration of programmable devices was released and is now a common feature of FPGAs and their supporting software systems. IEEE-1581 was developed in 2011 to provide a convenient method of testing interconnects of high-speed memories with slow-speed test vectors; a version of this capability is implemented in some DDR4 memory components. To address the new application of combined capacitive sensing and boundary-scan test, IEEE-1149.8.1 was published in 2012. The extensibility of JTAG has been proven time and again.

More recently, efforts have been made to standardize JTAG access to instruments embedded within ICs. The IEEE-1149.1 standard was updated once more in 2013 for some housekeeping and to add extensions to access these instruments. Just one year later, an alternative standard for accessing these instruments, IEEE-1687, was published. Looking to the future, industry activities to extend JTAG into 3D-IC testing, system-level testing, and high-speed testing are already underway, proving that the versatility and extensibility of JTAG is here to stay.

How Does JTAG Work?

The JTAG/boundary-scan test architecture was originally developed as a method to test interconnects between ICs mounted on a PCB without using physical test probes. Boundary-scan cells created using multiplexer and latch circuits are attached to each pin on the device. These cells, embedded in the device, can capture data from pin or core logic signals as well as force data onto pins. Captured data is serially shifted out through the JTAG Test Access Port (TAP) and can be compared to expected values to determine a pass or fail result. Forced test data is serially shifted into the boundary-scan cells. All of this is controlled from a serial data path called the scan path or scan chain.

Because each pin can be individually controlled, boundary-scan eliminates a large number of test vectors that would normally needed to properly initialize sequential logic. Using JTAG, tens or hundreds of test vectors may do the job that had previously required thousands. Boundary-scan enables shorter test times, higher test coverage, increased diagnostic capability, and lower capital equipment cost.

The principles of interconnect test using boundary-scan components are illustrated in Figure 3. Two boundary-scan compliant devices are connected with four nets. The first device includes four outputs that are driving the four inputs of the other with predefined values. In this case, we assume that the circuit includes two faults: a short fault between Net2 and Net3, and an open fault on Net4. We will also assume that a short between two nets behaves as a wired-AND and an open fault behaves as a stuck-at-1 condition.

To detect and isolate defects, the tester shifts the patterns shown in Figure 3 into the first boundary-scan register and applies these patterns to the inputs of the second device.

Of course, interconnect testing is just one of many uses of JTAG—the aforementioned JTAG TAP has been extended to support additional capabilities including in-system-programming (ISP), in-circuit-emulation (ICE), embedded functional testing, and many more. The standard accounts for the addition of device-specific instructions and registers that can be used to interact with additional IC capabilities. For example, a microprocessor device may have embedded functionality for data download, program execution, or register peek-and-poke activities accessible using JTAG TAP; using the same tools, FPGA and CPLD devices can be erased, configured, read-back, and controlled using JTAG instructions through the IEEE-1532 standard. More recently, embedded IC instrumentation—from instruments that measure voltage and current to devices that can execute high-speed test on the chip—has used the JTAG TAP as the access mechanism, providing new visibility into the IC and further expanding the scope of JTAG testing.The input values captured in the boundary-scan register of the second device are shifted out and compared to the expected values. In this case, the results, underlined and marked in red on Net2, Net3, and Net4, do not match the expected values and the tester tags these nets as faulty. Sophisticated algorithms are used to automatically generate the minimal set of test vectors to detect, isolate, and diagnose faults to specific nets, devices, and pins.

JTAG for Product Life-Cycle Phases and Applications

While JTAG/boundary-scan was originally regarded as a method to test electronic products during the production phase, new developments and applications of the IEEE-1149.1 standard have enabled the use of JTAG in many other product life cycle phases. Boundary-scan technology is commonly applied to product design, prototype debugging, and field service as depicted in Figure 4.

The same test suite used to validate design testability can adapted and utilized for board bring-up, high-volume manufacturing test, troubleshooting and repairs, and even field service and reprogramming. The versatility of JTAG/boundary-scan tools delivers immense value to organizations beyond the production phase.

JTAG Test Basics

Most JTAG/boundary-scan systems are composed of two main components: a test program generator for test development and creation, and a test program executive for running tests and reporting results.

JTAG Test Program Generator

Test program generators accept computer aided design (CAD) data as input in the form of a netlist, bill of materials, schematic, and layout information. The test program generator (TPG) uses the information provided in these files, along with guidance from the test developer, to automatically create test patterns for fault detection and isolation using JTAG-testable nets on the PCB. Full-featured test program generation software will generally also include the capability to automatically generate tests for non-scannable components including logic clusters and memories that are connected to boundary-scan devices. A sample of faults that can be detected with automatically generated tests is shown in Figure 1.

JTAG Test Program Executive

Test program executives are used to run the tests created by the test program generation software. The test executive interfaces with the JTAG hardware to execute test patterns on a unit under test (UUT), then compares the results with expected values and attempts to diagnose any failures. Modern test executives include advanced features such as flow control, support for third party test types, and often include an application programming interface (API) for integration with additional test systems or development of simplified operator interfaces.

JTAG Benefits

The continuous drive toward higher density interconnects and finer pitch ball-grid-array (BGA) components has fueled the need for test strategies that minimize the number of test points required. By embedding the test logic within the IC itself and limiting the physical interface to just a few signals, JTAG/boundary-scan presents an elegant solution to testing, debugging, and diagnosing modern electronic systems.

Today, JTAG provides the access mechanism for a variety of different system operations. Just some of the benefits provided by JTAG are:

Reuse through the product life cycle. The simple access mechanism provided by the JTAG TAP can be used at all stages of the product lifecycle—from benchtop prototype debugging to high volume manufacturing and even in the field.

Test point reduction. JTAG provides test access through just 4 pins (2 pins for IEEE-1149.7 compliant devices), reducing the number of test points required, resulting in lower PCB fabrication costs and reduced test fixture complexity.

Independent observation and control. Boundary-scan tests operate independently of the system logic, meaning they can be used to diagnose systems that may not operate functionally.

Extensibility. JTAG has seen continuous development and new applications are frequently being discovered. Additional standards have been developed to address AC-coupled testing, reduced pin counts, and control of test instruments embedded within ICs.

JTAG Scan Chain Infrastructure Test

JTAG testing usually begins by checking the underlying infrastructure to ensure that all devices are connected and test capabilities are operational. Test patterns are used to exercise the instruction register and boundary-scan register for comparison against expected lengths and values. If present, device ID codes can also be read and compared against expected values to ensure that the correct component has been placed.

JTAG Interconnect, Bus Wire, and Resistor Tests

After verifying that the scan chain is working properly, test patterns can be used to verify interconnectivity between system components. Nets that involve three or more boundary-scan pins represent a special case, called a bus wire, where additional patterns can be used to isolate faults to a specific pin, as shown in Figure 2. During a buswire test, boundary-scan driver pins are tested one at a time to ensure that all possible opens are tested.

Devices that are transparent to DC signals can be modeled as “short” signal paths and included in the test; for example, series resistors can be tested for component presence and open faults, while directional buffers can be constrained and tested to ensure that signals sampled at the buffer output pins match the signals that are applied to the buffer input pins. Additionally, tests for AC-coupled signals can be integrated with interconnect and buswire tests in systems with IEEE-1149.6 standard components, allowing capacitors to be tested for AC signal transparency.

Special tests can also be used to check pull-up and pull-down resistors, ensuring that resistors are present in the assembled system in addition to testing the nets for open and short faults. To accomplish this, resistors are tested by first driving the signal to a state opposite the pulled value. The net is then tri-stated, allowing the resistor to pull the signal back to the original state. Finally, the signal is sampled and the value is compared to the expected pulled value.

JTAG Testing in Logic, Memory, & Complex Devices

Not only can interconnections between boundary-scan components and simple transparent components be tested, but additional non-boundary-scan components can be controlled and tested for functionality and continuity using connected boundary-scan components. Simple test patterns may be used to test logic devices such as decoders or multiplexers, while sophisticated scripts may be used control and test complex devices for basic or advanced functionality, including analog-to-digital converters, UARTs, and Ethernet PHYs.

A common application of a cluster tests uses the storage capability of RAM devices to verify interconnects between a boundary-scan device and a connected memory. Using a model of the memory component, tests can be automatically created to write specific data patterns to memory addresses and then read back and compared against the expected value. These patterns are designed to ensure that all memory data and address signals are driven to both high and low logic states. The same concept used to test RAM can also be applied to non-volatile memory, such as flash, EEPROM, and NVRAM components.

JTAG Testing throughout Product Lifecycle

While JTAG/boundary-scan was originally regarded as a method to test electronic products during the production phase, new developments and applications of the IEEE-1149.1 standard have enabled the use of JTAG in many other product life cycle phases. Boundary-scan technology is commonly applied to product design, prototype debugging, and field service.

The same test suite used to validate design testability can adapted and utilized for board bring-up, high-volume manufacturing test, troubleshooting and repairs, and even field service and reprogramming. The versatility of JTAG/boundary-scan tools delivers immense value to organizations beyond the production phase.

JTAG Embedded Test

Many modern processors use JTAG as the main interface for on-chip debugging (OCD), allowing the processor to be controlled over the JTAG port within an embedded system.

Using this same interface, the JTAG port can be used to initialize a processor, download and run a test program, and then obtain results; this test technique is a fast, convenient method for developing and executing peripheral tests and in-system-programming operations in embedded systems.

Because these tests run at the system processor speed, defects that may not be identified during low-speed execution can be detected.

In-System-Programming with JTAG

In addition to test applications, JTAG is also frequently used as the primary method to program devices such as flash memory and CPLDs. To program flash devices, the pins of a connected boundary-scan-compatible component can be used to control the memory and erase, program, and verify the component using the boundary-scan chain. FPGA and CPLD devices that support IEEE-1532 standard instructions can be accessed and programmed directly using the JTAG port.

Faster performance can be achieved using a CPU or FPGA to program the flash. In these cases, a small flash programming application is downloaded to the controlling device over the JTAG port, which is then used to interface between the test system and the flash programming application running on the embedded system. The program can run at much higher speeds than boundary-scan, increasing production throughput and rivaling or surpassing the speeds of USB and Ethernet-based programming solutions, without requiring an operating system or high-level software be present on the embedded system.

The IEEE-1149.1 JTAG team had the foresight to design an extensible standard—one that could employ additional data registers for many different applications. As a result, JTAG has grown from its original roots for board testing into a ubiquitous port that can be used for diverse applications such as in-system-programming, on-chip debugging, and more recently control of instruments embedded within ICs.

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Work Gloves Guide

 

WORK GLOVES FOR YOUR PROJECT

Work gloves are worn to protect hands from potential mechanical hazards such as punctures, abrasions, cuts, and flame. They are further specialized for performing a certain task. These include multipurpose work gloves, construction gloves, general utility gloves, mechanics gloves (automotive work), leather welding gloves, insulated work gloves ( to keep warm during winters), leather working gloves, and rubber or latex gloves.

We should wear work gloves when working with hazardous chemicals and risky materials because they give protection against infections, contamination, and hazards including:

  • Abrasions
  • Punctures
  • Burns
  • Heat
  • Acid spillage
  • Cuts and wounds

NITRILE COATED WORK GLOVES

Industrial environments of today carry many activities that have risks. Governments and businesses in many countries define guidelines that benefit the safety of their workers. Many industrial applications promote the use of nitrile coated work gloves for industry workers as a means of safety.

Safer Grip Gloves by OPNBar

10053 Whittwood Dr, Suite 11284 Whittier,

CA 90603 USA

657-667-6227

info@safergrip.net/

For Those with Allergy Concerns

Nitrile coated work gloves are a type of glove made from nylone and coated with synthetic rubber. Nitrile is a polymer compound with a production process similar to that of making rubber. Unlike rubber however, nitrile is a 100% synthetic substance and typically does not create any type of allergic reaction on the human body and as a result, is accepted and used in many businesses. Nitrile is the synthetic form of latex and is commonly chosen for its strength.

Nitrile Latex vs Rubber

Just like natural rubber, Nitrile latex does not contain latex proteins. Nitrile rubber provides excellent resistance to tears and punctures and is almost 3 times stronger than natural rubber. Nitrile stands up well to oil, and makes it is a good choice for handling small wet/oily parts.

Features of Nitrile Coated Work Gloves

The main feature of knit nylon work gloves coated with nitrile is their good grip and dexterity. Nitrile coated palm and fingers provide protection from abrasion, excellent grip, are extremely thin and durable, are breathable, comfortable, cut resistant, have great dexterity, tactility, and sensitivity.

There are various types of Nitrile coated glove dips available, some of them which include Nitrile palm coated work gloves, foam Nitrile coated gloves, and fully coated Nitrile gloves.

All-Weather Work Gloves

Many businesses use nitrile work gloves for their workers and most of these companies, especially in cold weather areas of the world. Nitrile coated work gloves can keep worker’s hands warm in cold weather conditions and allow them to move their hands freely and easily even in cold conditions as well as protect their hands from harmful substances, cuts, and abrasion.

Works Well with Wet Conditions and Oil

Nitrile coated work gloves withstand oils and have tactility even when wet. Nitrile coatings protect hands by preventing oil from penetrating through the gloves. Some applications include working with small or oily parts, as nitrile coating provides a secure grip.

Durable and Long Lasting

Nitrile coated work gloves do not easily break down, delaminate or blister-like other coating materials in the presence of oils and in general. This makes nitrile coated gloves a choice for jobs that require a high degree of sensitivity and dexterity, especially when grip is important such as assembly, construction, painting, working on automotive, handling small oily parts and components, gardening, machining, maintenance, warehouses, and trucking. Recreationally, they are also great for gardening, and various outdoor activities that require grip in wet conditions, like boating, fishing, hiking, and biking.

Other Information on Nitrile Coated Work Gloves

Nitrile-coated work gloves are perfect for general work because of their durability and robustness. The nitrile coating will prevent cuts, tears, and even abrasions. These gloves work well between -25 F and 350 F.

Nitrile-coated work gloves are durable, but they will not provide a robust grip in oily and wet conditions compared to micropore nitrile gloves.

Nitrile foam coating may not be ideal for liquids and adhesives because they may seep inside the gloves.

SAFER GRIP Work Gloves by OPNBAR™️ are ideal work gloves for all-day use for light manufacturing, warehouse operators, and for use in maintenance areas.

New and improved Safer Grip nitrile coated gloves by OPNBar are ideal multi-purpose work gloves for various applications like trucking and delivery, warehouses, maintenance areas, light manufacturing and carpentry. They are also great for gardening, and various outdoor activities that require grip in wet conditions, like boating, fishing, hiking, and biking.

LEATHER WORK GLOVES

Leather work gloves often protect hands during construction, working with lumber, masonry, and welding.  They endure abrasions, heat and acts as shock absorbers, and are puncture-resistant.  Leather is an easily available material with unique qualities suitable for multiple tasks. Synthetic leather is lighter than natural and dries quickly.

Specialized leather work gloves provide robustness and heat dissipation. Untreated Leather can withstand high temperatures up to 430F and 600F when tanned with chrome that makes it suitable for tasks involving heat exposure. Gauntlet-style cuffs protect wrists from metal fragments and sparks.

  • Top grain leather: When it comes to comfort and dexterity it is best as its texture is smooth and soft.
  • Split leather: It is more economical and denser than grain leather and more resistant to abrasion and water.

Some fabric work gloves can have leather reinforced on high wear areas like palm, fingers, and fingertips. This makes it more flexible and allows hands to breath.

RUBBER OR LATEX WORK GLOVES

Rubber or latex work gloves provide waterproofing and endurance against abrasions and vibrations. They have a coating or shell covering fingertips and palm offering a good grip, breathability, flexibility and fits tightly to the hand to improve sensitivity and dexterity.

They’re more resistant to punctures than vinyl and neoprene, but punctures can be difficult to see.  Latex is not effective against all chemicals, and it tends to degrade due to contact with turpentine or petroleum-based products such as gasoline, kerosene, acetone, and mineral spirits. Some people are allergic to natural latex, so this type of glove is not suitable for everyone.

CLEANING AND FINISHING WORK GLOVES

Cleaning gloves should provide more grip to hold wet objects easily. Preferably, it should have raised texture to channel more liquid away. Additionally, long cuffs of cleaning gloves keep forearms dry to avoid chapping.

Powder and powder-free cleaning work gloves: Some gloves have a powder lining to absorb moisture making it easier to wear gloves. Powder-free gloves should be used while painting, polishing, and sealing as they can mar the finishing. They are also an alternative for powder allergic people.

Reusable cleaning work gloves: These are more durable, thicker, and comfortable due to flocked lining but they provide less dexterity and touch sensitivity. They require more care and maintenance.

Disposable cleaning work gloves: They provide protection against any accidental spillage r chemical contact. They need to be replaced after every chemical contact. It provides better touch sensation and dexterity.

CONSTRUCTION OF WORK GLOVES

  • A straight thumb is designed for tasks that involve gripping. A seam runs around the thumb and does not interfere with the task.
  • A wing thumb design does not have a seam between palm and thumb rather has an angled thumb to provide good comfort for continuous tasks.
  • A keystone thumb provides comfort and dexterity due to its ergonomic design.
  • Some work gloves have a seam under two middle fingers and a natural crease cut for the palm to improve comfort.

FEATURES OF WORK GLOVES

  • Fingers compatible with touch screen
  • Breathable fabric to avoid sweating
  • Impact-absorbing pads on the palm
  • Should be flame resistant
  • Easily cleanable and machine washing
  • Plastic or rubber studs to protect the back of the hand from vibrations and punctures
  • Vibration absorbing pads on fingers and palm

TYPES OF WORK GLOVES CUFF

Glove cuff is designed according to a particular task; some fit tightly to protect the wrist while others have loose fittings (to allow immediate removal in case of emergency). Here are some types of cuffs;

  • BAND TOP CUFF: This type of cuff has a large, loose cuff that allows quick removal upon emergency and improves breathing and airflow of hand.
  • KNIT CUFF: This type of cuff has a tight wrist fitting to keep work gloves in place. It allows slow removal of gloves and prevents dirt and debris from entering.
  • ELASTIC CUFF: These are easier to put on and remove because of their short length. It has a chip closure at the wrist.
  • EXTENDED CUFF: Provides forearm and wrist protection with loose-fitting to improve airflow. Usually used for cleaning gloves.
  • HOOK AND LOOP CUFF: It helps to keep dirt out and allows work gloves to be in place with tight-fitting.
  • BALL AND TAPE CUFF: Clings tightly to the wrist and provides effective protection.
  • PINKED CUFF: It has loose-fitting to allow fast removal and consists of a zigzag pattern cut into the cuff this helps to catch drips.

SIZE OF WORK GLOVES

To find glove size use measuring tape in inches and always take measurements from the dominant hand i.e if you are right-handed take measurement from the right hand and vice versa. Some brands consider glove size by numbers and some by letters like s for small. The size of the glove varies from manufacturer to manufacturer.

  • Take the measurement around the hand at the widest part excluding the thumb.
  • Take another measurement from the fingertip of the middle finger to the base of the hand.

SAFETY PROTOCOLS OF WORK GLOVES

Gloves should be used with specific guidelines to ensure protection and safety.

  • You should clean and maintain reusable work gloves.
  • Before working with chemicals make sure that your work gloves are effective against that specific chemical.
  • Notice any burning or itching sensation while working because it is the indicator that you might be using the wrong glove.

What is JTAG?

Introduction

JTAG is an integrated method for testing interconnects on printed circuit boards (PCBs) that are implemented at the integrated circuit (IC) level.  Since its introduction as an industry standard in 1990, JTAG has continuously grown in adoption, popularity, and usefulness—even today, new revisions and supplements to the IEEE Std.-1149.1 standard are being developed and implemented. This document is a brief introduction to the nature and history of JTAG, from its introduction to new extensions in current development.

JTAG Technology

JTAG is commonly referred to as boundary-scan and defined by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) 1149.1, which originally began as an integrated method for testing interconnects on printed circuit boards (PCBs) implemented at the integrated circuit (IC) level. As PCBs grew in complexity and density—a trend that continues today—limitations in the traditional test methods of in-circuit testers (ICTs) and bed of nails fixtures became evident. Packaging formats, specifically Ball Grid Array (BGA) and other fine pitch components, designed to meet ever-increasing physical space constraints, also led to a loss of physical access to signals.

These new technology developments led to dramatic increases in costs related to designing and building bed of nails fixtures; at the same time, circuit board test coverage also suffered. JTAG/boundary-scan presented an elegant solution to this problem: build functionality into the IC to assist in testing assembled electronic systems.

Today, JTAG is used for everything from testing interconnects and functionality on ICs to programming flash memory of systems deployed in the field and everything in-between. JTAG and its related standards have been and will continue to be extended to address additional challenges in electronic test and manufacturing, including test of 3D ICs and complex, hierarchical systems.

History of JTAG

In the 1980s, the Joint Test Action Group (JTAG) set out to develop a specification for boundary-scan testing that was standardized in 1990 as the IEEE Std. 1149.1-1990. A few years later in 1993, a new revision to the standard—1149.1a—was introduced to clarify, correct, and enhance the original specification. An additional supplement, 1149.1b, was published in 1994 to add Boundary-Scan Description Language (BSDL) to the standard, paving the way for fast, automated test development and spurring continuous adoption by major electronics producers all over the world. The lessons that were learned became formalized in an update to the core standard in 2001 and IEEE-1149.1-2001 was published.

As new applications of JTAG were discovered, new standards were developed to extend the capabilities of JTAG. Standards such as the IEEE-1149.5 module test and maintenance bus standard in 1995 and the IEEE-1149.4 standard for mixed-signal testing in 1999 were met with low adoption rates and are not widely used at present. The IEEE-1149.6 standard introduced in 2003, on the other hand, began with slow adoption but has since become standard in many ICs as the technology it addressed—high-speed, AC-coupled signals—became a common feature of electronic systems. IEEE-1149.7, published in 2009 to address the need for JTAG in low-pin-count systems, is now standard on many popular microcontrollers.

Additional standards have also been published to add specific test capabilities. In 2002, the IEEE-1532 standard for in-system configuration of programmable devices was released and is now a common feature of FPGAs and their supporting software systems. IEEE-1581 was developed in 2011 to provide a convenient method of testing interconnects of high-speed memories with slow-speed test vectors; a version of this capability is implemented in some DDR4 memory components. To address the new application of combined capacitive sensing and boundary-scan test, IEEE-1149.8.1 was published in 2012. The extensibility of JTAG has been proven time and again.

More recently, efforts have been made to standardize JTAG access to instruments embedded within ICs. The IEEE-1149.1 standard was updated once more in 2013 for some housekeeping and to add extensions to access these instruments. Just one year later, an alternative standard for accessing these instruments, IEEE-1687, was published. Looking to the future, industry activities to extend JTAG into 3D-IC testing, system-level testing, and high-speed testing are already underway, proving that the versatility and extensibility of JTAG is here to stay.

How Does JTAG Work?

The JTAG/boundary-scan test architecture was originally developed as a method to test interconnects between ICs mounted on a PCB without using physical test probes. Boundary-scan cells created using multiplexer and latch circuits are attached to each pin on the device. These cells, embedded in the device, can capture data from pin or core logic signals as well as force data onto pins. Captured data is serially shifted out through the JTAG Test Access Port (TAP) and can be compared to expected values to determine a pass or fail result. Forced test data is serially shifted into the boundary-scan cells. All of this is controlled from a serial data path called the scan path or scan chain.

Because each pin can be individually controlled, boundary-scan eliminates a large number of test vectors that would normally needed to properly initialize sequential logic. Using JTAG, tens or hundreds of test vectors may do the job that had previously required thousands. Boundary-scan enables shorter test times, higher test coverage, increased diagnostic capability, and lower capital equipment cost.

Two boundary-scan compliant devices are connected with four nets. The first device includes four outputs that are driving the four inputs of the other with predefined values. In this case, we assume that the circuit includes two faults: a short fault between Net2 and Net3, and an open fault on Net4. We will also assume that a short between two nets behaves as a wired-AND and an open fault behaves as a stuck-at-1 condition.

To detect and isolate defects, the tester shifts the patterns 3 into the first boundary-scan register and applies these patterns to the inputs of the second device.

Of course, interconnect testing is just one of many uses of JTAG—the aforementioned JTAG TAP has been extended to support additional capabilities including in-system-programming (ISP), in-circuit-emulation (ICE), embedded functional testing, and many more. The standard accounts for the addition of device-specific instructions and registers that can be used to interact with additional IC capabilities. For example, a microprocessor device may have embedded functionality for data download, program execution, or register peek-and-poke activities accessible using JTAG TAP; using the same tools, FPGA and CPLD devices can be erased, configured, read-back, and controlled using JTAG instructions through the IEEE-1532 standard. More recently, embedded IC instrumentation—from instruments that measure voltage and current to devices that can execute high-speed test on the chip—has used the JTAG TAP as the access mechanism, providing new visibility into the IC and further expanding the scope of JTAG testing.The input values captured in the boundary-scan register of the second device are shifted out and compared to the expected values. In this case, the results, underlined and marked in red on Net2, Net3, and Net4, do not match the expected values and the tester tags these nets as faulty. Sophisticated algorithms are used to automatically generate the minimal set of test vectors to detect, isolate, and diagnose faults to specific nets, devices, and pins.

JTAG for Product Life-Cycle Phases and Applications

While JTAG/boundary-scan was originally regarded as a method to test electronic products during the production phase, new developments and applications of the IEEE-1149.1 standard have enabled the use of JTAG in many other product life cycle phases. Boundary-scan technology is commonly applied to product design, prototype debugging, and field service.

The same test suite used to validate design testability can adapted and utilized for board bring-up, high-volume manufacturing test, troubleshooting and repairs, and even field service and reprogramming. The versatility of JTAG/boundary-scan tools delivers immense value to organizations beyond the production phase.

JTAG Test Basics

Most JTAG/boundary-scan systems are composed of two main components: a test program generator for test development and creation, and a test program executive for running tests and reporting results.

JTAG Test Program Generator

Test program generators accept computer aided design (CAD) data as input in the form of a netlist, bill of materials, schematic, and layout information. The test program generator (TPG) uses the information provided in these files, along with guidance from the test developer, to automatically create test patterns for fault detection and isolation using JTAG-testable nets on the PCB. Full-featured test program generation software will generally also include the capability to automatically generate tests for non-scannable components including logic clusters and memories that are connected to boundary-scan devices.

JTAG Test Program Executive

Test program executives are used to run the tests created by the test program generation software. The test executive interfaces with the JTAG hardware to execute test patterns on a unit under test (UUT), then compares the results with expected values and attempts to diagnose any failures. Modern test executives include advanced features such as flow control, support for third party test types, and often include an application programming interface (API) for integration with additional test systems or development of simplified operator interfaces.

JTAG Benefits

The continuous drive toward higher density interconnects and finer pitch ball-grid-array (BGA) components has fueled the need for test strategies that minimize the number of test points required. By embedding the test logic within the IC itself and limiting the physical interface to just a few signals, JTAG/boundary-scan presents an elegant solution to testing, debugging, and diagnosing modern electronic systems.

Today, JTAG provides the access mechanism for a variety of different system operations. Just some of the benefits provided by JTAG are:

Reuse through the product life cycle. The simple access mechanism provided by the JTAG TAP can be used at all stages of the product lifecycle—from benchtop prototype debugging to high volume manufacturing and even in the field.

Test point reduction. JTAG provides test access through just 4 pins (2 pins for IEEE-1149.7 compliant devices), reducing the number of test points required, resulting in lower PCB fabrication costs and reduced test fixture complexity.

Independent observation and control. Boundary-scan tests operate independently of the system logic, meaning they can be used to diagnose systems that may not operate functionally.

Extensibility. JTAG has seen continuous development and new applications are frequently being discovered. Additional standards have been developed to address AC-coupled testing, reduced pin counts, and control of test instruments embedded within ICs.

JTAG Scan Chain Infrastructure Test

JTAG testing usually begins by checking the underlying infrastructure to ensure that all devices are connected and test capabilities are operational. Test patterns are used to exercise the instruction register and boundary-scan register for comparison against expected lengths and values. If present, device ID codes can also be read and compared against expected values to ensure that the correct component has been placed.

JTAG Interconnect, Bus Wire, and Resistor Tests

After verifying that the scan chain is working properly, test patterns can be used to verify interconnectivity between system components. Nets that involve three or more boundary-scan pins represent a special case, called a bus wire, where additional patterns can be used to isolate faults to a specific pin. During a buswire test, boundary-scan driver pins are tested one at a time to ensure that all possible opens are tested.

Devices that are transparent to DC signals can be modeled as “short” signal paths and included in the test; for example, series resistors can be tested for component presence and open faults, while directional buffers can be constrained and tested to ensure that signals sampled at the buffer output pins match the signals that are applied to the buffer input pins. Additionally, tests for AC-coupled signals can be integrated with interconnect and buswire tests in systems with IEEE-1149.6 standard components, allowing capacitors to be tested for AC signal transparency.

Special tests can also be used to check pull-up and pull-down resistors, ensuring that resistors are present in the assembled system in addition to testing the nets for open and short faults. To accomplish this, resistors are tested by first driving the signal to a state opposite the pulled value. The net is then tri-stated, allowing the resistor to pull the signal back to the original state. Finally, the signal is sampled and the value is compared to the expected pulled value.

JTAG Testing in Logic, Memory, & Complex Devices

Not only can interconnections between boundary-scan components and simple transparent components be tested, but additional non-boundary-scan components can be controlled and tested for functionality and continuity using connected boundary-scan components. Simple test patterns may be used to test logic devices such as decoders or multiplexers, while sophisticated scripts may be used control and test complex devices for basic or advanced functionality, including analog-to-digital converters, UARTs, and Ethernet PHYs.

A common application of a cluster tests uses the storage capability of RAM devices to verify interconnects between a boundary-scan device and a connected memory. Using a model of the memory component, tests can be automatically created to write specific data patterns to memory addresses and then read back and compared against the expected value. These patterns are designed to ensure that all memory data and address signals are driven to both high and low logic states. The same concept used to test RAM can also be applied to non-volatile memory, such as flash, EEPROM, and NVRAM components.

JTAG Testing throughout Product Lifecycle

While JTAG/boundary-scan was originally regarded as a method to test electronic products during the production phase, new developments and applications of the IEEE-1149.1 standard have enabled the use of JTAG in many other product life cycle phases. Boundary-scan technology is commonly applied to product design, prototype debugging, and field service.

The same test suite used to validate design testability can adapted and utilized for board bring-up, high-volume manufacturing test, troubleshooting and repairs, and even field service and reprogramming. The versatility of JTAG/boundary-scan tools delivers immense value to organizations beyond the production phase.

JTAG Embedded Test

Many modern processors use JTAG as the main interface for on-chip debugging (OCD), allowing the processor to be controlled over the JTAG port within an embedded system.

Using this same interface, the JTAG port can be used to initialize a processor, download and run a test program, and then obtain results; this test technique is a fast, convenient method for developing and executing peripheral tests and in-system-programming operations in embedded systems.

Because these tests run at the system processor speed, defects that may not be identified during low-speed execution can be detected.

For more information see this videohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Netxo6NZ2Ws

In-System-Programming with JTAG

In addition to test applications, JTAG is also frequently used as the primary method to program devices such as flash memory and CPLDs. To program flash devices, the pins of a connected boundary-scan-compatible component can be used to control the memory and erase, program, and verify the component using the boundary-scan chain. FPGA and CPLD devices that support IEEE-1532 standard instructions can be accessed and programmed directly using the JTAG port.

Faster performance can be achieved using a CPU or FPGA to program the flash. In these cases, a small flash programming application is downloaded to the controlling device over the JTAG port, which is then used to interface between the test system and the flash programming application running on the embedded system. The program can run at much higher speeds than boundary-scan, increasing production throughput and rivaling or surpassing the speeds of USB and Ethernet-based programming solutions, without requiring an operating system or high-level software be present on the embedded system.

The IEEE-1149.1 JTAG team had the foresight to design an extensible standard—one that could employ additional data registers for many different applications. As a result, JTAG has grown from its original roots for board testing into a ubiquitous port that can be used for diverse applications such as in-system-programming, on-chip debugging, and more recently control of instruments embedded within ICs.

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In and Out Electrical Solutions to Ensure Safety of Life and Properties

Introduction 

Modern electrical systems function seamlessly and involve safe yet easy operations. However, almost every type of electrical device may cause malfunction leading to a few devastating consequences for the entire property. In this situation, you should look for experts associated with offering In & Out Electrical  solutions.

Scope of Electrical Services 

Identification of Hazards 

When you choose expert electricians from https://www.inoutelectrical.com/, they will inspect your building thoroughly. Accordingly, professionals will identify any faulty or damaged wire, check the condition of outdated appliances, and identify damage in the electrical panel. In other words, regular electrical maintenance service prevents several catastrophic incidents, like electrocutions and electrical fires, along with several other types of potential hazards. 

Checking Safety Equipment 

In some cases, electrical equipment plays the role of safety equipment in properties. Indeed, malfunctioning of such electrical appliances will endanger the safety of human life and properties. In this situation, professionals offering In & Out Electrical services check the carbon monoxide detectors and fire alarms to make sure that everything stays up to the mark. Depending on the client’s requirements, electricians will inspect the surge protector of your commercial or domestic unit to make sure of its functionality. Other than that, expert help ensures the proper operation of your GFCI and AFCI outlets. 

Inspection of the Electric Panel 

Damage to the electric panel may put your entire resident or office space at a huge risk. The reason is an electric panel works as the brain and the heart of the complete electric system. Hence, you should refer to electricians to reverberate the underlying problems throughout your domestic unit. Experts should watch out for a few key signs related to electric panel problems. These include buzzing sounds, burning smells, flickering lights, visible damage or dents, and frequently tripped electric circuit breakers. Other than that, you should stay alert while noticing any warm emanation from the electric panel while you touch it. 

Check the Grounding Systems 

Grounding systems or searching systems provide a backup pathway for the passage of electric current. They are essential to stop unexpected electric current flow to avoid worsening or damage to your electronic devices. When earthing current enters the ground, the system will prevent many dangerous situations, including fire incidents. Furthermore, individuals must know that specifics associated with the grounding system will affect the electromagnetic effect and safety of your electrical equipment. Hence,

you should hire experts in electrical work to inspect and maintain your building’s grounding system. Regular inspection will allow professionals to ensure the functionality of the grounding system and upgrade it depending on the requirement. 

Conclusion 

Many individuals usually overlook the significance of regular electrical inspection and maintenance of their properties. However, one should schedule a time to periodically check every electrical appliance, similar to any other equipment present at home. Luckily, the internet medium lets you check https://www.inoutelectrical.com/ to collect information related to diverse electrical repairing, inspection, and maintenance solutions. Therefore, the right and timely electrical solutions will let you stay safe and happy with others. 

Contact us :-

Address: Bay Area Electrics 8494 Signal Hill San Francisco, CA, 20110

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Grip Gloves Guide

Employee safety should be a top priority in any company. Apart from the obvious pain and suffering with worker deaths and injuries, workers who are injured on the job could sue a company for financial damages. Injuries may make them less productive when they return to work. It is important that employers effectively communicate safety standards to every employee, and train them properly.

Safer Grip Gloves by OPNBar™️ are ideal work grip gloves for all-day use for light manufacturing, warehouse operators, and for use in maintenance areas.

Our new and improved Safer Grip nitrile coated grip gloves by OPNBar are ideal multi-purpose work grip gloves for various applications like trucking and delivery, warehouses, maintenance areas, light manufacturing and carpentry. They are also great for gardening, and various outdoor activities that require grip in wet conditions, like boating, fishing, hiking, and biking.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=daEkuVNAipY%E2%80%8B

Coated Grip Gloves

Safer Grip nitrile coated gloves are made of 15-Gauge nylon polyester engineered yarn. The glove conforms to the operator’s hand and offers maximum flexibility and comfort. Safer Grip spandex nylon glove palms are coated in micro-foam nitrile, and are quite flexible, making Safer Grip nitrile coated grip gloves the perfect nitrile foam gloves for working with tools and protecting your hands and products. The latest glove offers a durable thumb crotch for extra grip and protection.

Coated foam grip gloves are extremely popular, primarily because they have a good price point.  They are effective and comfortable, provide great dexterity, and protect operator hands from hazards, as well as protect products from workers’ hands.

Safer Grip Gloves by OPNBar

10053 Whittwood Dr, Suite 11284 Whittier,

CA 90603 USA

657-667-6227

info@safergrip.net

Foam coatings can be applied and used in wet, oily, cold, and normal situations. Safer Grip spandex gloves with a long lasting microfoam nitrile coating are breathable with a coarse surface that can suck up oil and liquid, and maintain grip and tactility even when wet.

Nitrile Foam Grip Gloves Coating

Safer Grip Gloves by OPNBar™️ grip gloves are dipped in a special longer lasting formula, with a durable nitrile foam coating that improves tactility and dexterity. The foam coating resists cuts, abrasions, and tears, and is also a good alternative for people with latex allergies or want an alternative to leather. Safer Grip gloves are dipped in an improved nitrile microfoam formula in a three-quarter palm dip. Micro-foam technology offers great breathability, making them cool and comfortable to wear, in any environment.

Lots of Features

  • 15-Gauge Nylon/Spandex Liner
  • Tough Micro-Foam Nitrile Coating
  • Touchscreen Compatible Grip Gloves that Work with Phone
  • Superior Grip, Dexterity & Protection
  • Ultra Soft Fitting, Breathable
  • Abrasion Resistance: 40,000 cycles, EN388:4131X
  • Oeko-Tex Standard 100, Skin Friendly, Latex Free
  • Machine Washable
  • CE Compliance

Safer Grip nitrile coated grip gloves are CE Certified, EN388 4131 compliant, and have an abrasion resistance of 40,000 cycles. Safer Grip gloves are Oeko Tek Standard 100, are skin friendly, latex free, and guarantee a high level of protection, comfort, and durability.

STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® is one of the world’s best-known labels for textiles tested for harmful substances. It stands for customer confidence and high product safety.

SAFER GRIP Gloves by OPNBAR™️ apparel carries the STANDARD 100 label.  You can be certain that every component has been tested for harmful substances and are harmless for human health.

In the test, they take into account numerous regulated and non-regulated substances, which may be harmful to human health. In many cases, the limit values for the STANDARD 100 go beyond national and international requirements.

More Features of Safer Grip

  • Touchscreen Compatible Grip Gloves that Work with Phone
  • These work gloves are also touchscreen compatible on 4 fingers!
  • Ultra Soft Fitting, Breathable
  • These lightweight work gloves offer superior breathability and are quite form fitting.
  • Superior Grip, Dexterity & Protection
  • Nitrile coated work gloves offer versatile protection for many environments.
  • Reinforced Thumb Crotch
  • The thumb crotch on these work gloves provides a firm grip for these grip gloves.
  • Abrasion Resistance: 40,000 cycles, EN388:4131X
  • SAFER GRIP gloves are tested to have an abrasion resistance of 40,000 cycles!

Tough Micro-Foam Nitrile Coating

SAFER GRIP nitrile dipped work gloves and nitrile coated in a special, long lasting formula.

  • Versatile Weather Protection
  • These safety gloves can offer protection not only for your hands and products, but also weather elements as well.
  • Latex Free, Skin Friendly
  • Skin friendly, latex free, and guarantee a high level of protection, comfort, and durability.
  • Industrial Use Features of Safer Grip
  • Construction, Carpentry, Roofing

Woodworking/Carpentry Gloves

These construction gloves are also great for being woodworking gloves and roofing gloves.

Warehouse Gloves

These warehouse gloves also make great moving gloves or box handling gloves.

Mechanic Gloves

These mechanics gloves also make great shop gloves or gloves for home improvement.

Truck Driver Gloves

SAFER GRIP gloves are popular truck driver gloves for their versatility and comfort.

Versatile Outdoor Uses of Safer Grip Gloves

Gardening Gloves

SAFER Grip gloves make great outdoor gloves and gardening gloves.

Hiking Gloves

These are great for everyday use in the outdoors and also make excellent hiking gloves.

Boating Gloves

Nitrile coated gloves provide dexterity in wet environments making them great boating gloves and fishing gloves.

Biking and Outdoor Gloves

These firm grip gloves are also great as biking gloves or daily outdoor gloves.

Protecting your hands should be your top priority, and the best way is to use work gloves. Yes, these work gloves are great as they provide a layer of protection to the knit gloves and give a non-slippery experience.

Gloves can be made of nylon, cotton, and even polyester or engineered yards called Kevlar or Dyneema. This material is an excellent alternative for expensive leather gloves.

The palm-coated industrial work gloves are great for different use in the automotive industry, construction, or even in sampling and handling products, which offer a better, and anti-slip grip.

Glove Coatings

The dip coating is applied on the knit gloves to give a good layer of protection. However, the amount of coating can be customized as follows:

Full Dip

The full dip allows covering the whole hand including the lower wrist.

Palm Dip

The palm dip will cover the whole palm including the fingertips for a better shield.

¾ Dip

The ¾ dip protects the palm, knuckles, and fingers.

What’s Grip Gloves Do you Prefer?

These tough coatings will give a perfect experience for handling tough materials filled with grease and chemicals. These gloves will enhance durability, chemical resistance, and even cut protection.

Many coatings can be used on knit gloves which are as follows:

  • Nitrile Foam
  • Latex
  • PVC
  • Neoprene
  • Zed coat
  • Micropore Nitrile
  • Polyurethane (PU)

Now, let us have a brief look at all these types of coating.

Nitrile Foam Coated Gloves

Industrial environments of today carry many activities that have risks. Governments and businesses in many countries define guidelines that benefit the safety of their workers. Many industrial applications promote the use of nitrile foam grip gloves for industry workers as a means of safety.

For Those with Allergy Concerns

Nitrile foam grip gloves are a type of glove made from nylone and coated with synthetic rubber. Nitrile is a polymer compound with a production process similar to that of making rubber. Unlike rubber however, nitrile is a 100% synthetic substance and typically does not create any type of allergic reaction on the human body and as a result, is accepted and used in many businesses. Nitrile is the synthetic form of latex and is commonly chosen for its strength.

Nitrile Latex vs Rubber

Just like natural rubber, Nitrile latex does not contain latex proteins. Nitrile rubber provides excellent resistance to tears and punctures and is almost 3 times stronger than natural rubber. Nitrile stands up well to oil, and makes it is a good choice for handling small wet/oily parts.

Features of Nitrile Foam Gloves

The main feature of knit nylon gloves coated with nitrile is their good grip and dexterity. Nitrile coated palm and fingers provide protection from abrasion, excellent grip, are extremely thin and durable, are breathable, comfortable, cut resistant, have great dexterity, tactility, and sensitivity.

There are various types of Nitrile coated glove dips available, some of them which include Nitrile palm coated grip gloves, foam Nitrile coated gloves, and fully coated Nitrile gloves.

All-Weather Grip Gloves

Many businesses use nitrile work grip gloves for their workers and most of these companies, especially in cold weather areas of the world. Nitrile foam gloves can keep worker’s hands warm in cold weather conditions and allow them to move their hands freely and easily even in cold conditions as well as protect their hands from harmful substances, cuts, and abrasion.

Works Well with Wet Conditions and Oil

Nitrile foam gloves withstand oils and have tactility even when wet. Nitrile coatings protect hands by preventing oil from penetrating through the gloves. Some applications include working with small or oily parts, as nitrile coating provides a secure grip.

Durable and Long Lasting

Nitrile foam gloves do not easily break down, delaminate or blister-like other coating materials in the presence of oils and in general. This makes nitrile foam gloves a choice for jobs that require a high degree of sensitivity and dexterity, especially when grip is important such as assembly, construction, painting, working on automotive, handling small oily parts and components, gardening, machining, maintenance, warehouses, and trucking. Recreationally, they are also great for gardening, and various outdoor activities that require grip in wet conditions, like boating, fishing, hiking, and biking.

Other Information on Nitrile Foam Gloves

Nitrile foam gloves are perfect for general work because of their durability and robustness. The nitrile coating will prevent cuts, tears, and even abrasions. These grip gloves work well between -25 F and 350 F.

Nitrile foam gloves are durable, but they will not provide a robust grip in oily and wet conditions compared to micropore nitrile gloves.

Nitrile foam coating may not be ideal for liquids and adhesives because they may seep inside the gloves.

Latex Coated Gloves

Latex-coated gloves are soft and flexible. These soft gloves give a perfect grip and an anti-slip experience. Latex-coated gloves work well in all circumstances and temperatures, and they are a perfect choice for high temperatures too.

Latex gloves fall in the category of the most durable gloves, but you may experience low abrasion and oil resistance. Latex gloves can resist the use of alcohol and some categories of ketones, but they won’t work well for organic solvents and hydrocarbons.

Latex gloves are perfect to use in construction, masonry, and even landscaping.

Micropore Nitrile Gloves

Micropore nitrile gloves work best for oily grip. These gloves consist of different suction cups which absorb all the oil and liquid providing a firm grip.

This coating doesn’t work well with adhesives, but the outcome is highly abrasion-resistant.

Polyurethane Coated Gloves

Polyurethane-coated gloves come with the best stretch and flexibility. These gloves work well for delicate applications, and the coating offers flexibility.

Polyurethane-coated gloves are resistant to all kinds of liquids, including oil. It is also heat resistant, but these gloves are not recommended to use above 79 degrees celsius. These polyurethane gloves work perfectly well for aerospace, fine part handling, and even with assembly and inspection.

PVC Gloves

PVC gloves work the best with adhesives, and they are abrasion-resistant. The adhesives won’t stick on the gloves so that you can work without any hassle. These gloves are best when working with furniture, automotive assembly, and trim applications.

These PVC gloves are perfect to use within cold conditions, and these PVC gloves are flexible but not tactile with rubber products.

Neoprene Coating Gloves

Neoprene coating gloves are synthetic rubber that also comes with chemical stability and heat resistance. These gloves are suitable for chemical-resistant and fire-retardant installations.

Neoprene coating will provide a dry, oily, and wet grip, but it has low resistance towards abrasion.

Final Verdict!

Nitrile foam grip gloves are more versatile do not easily break down, delaminate or blister-like other coating materials in general. This makes nitrile foam gloves a choice for jobs that require a high degree of sensitivity and dexterity, especially when grip is important such as assembly, construction, painting, working on automotive, handling small oily parts and components, gardening, machining, maintenance, warehouses, and trucking. Recreationally, they are also great for gardening, and various outdoor activities that require grip in wet conditions, like boating, fishing, hiking, and biking.

Looking for comfortable grip gloves should be your topmost priority so that there is no chance of removing these grip gloves and damaging your skin and hands.

Nitrile foam grip gloves will become your new favorite with a long-lasting experience.

How Lifeline Hydration Package of Hydrate IV Therapy Boosts Immunity and Promotes Optimum Health

Introduction 

The condition of chronic dehydration has become common in about 75 percent of people staying in the United States of America. Many people consume water in excessively fewer amounts than that required by their bodies. A few people also intake tea and similar types of caffeinated beverages multiple times a day, which further leads to dehydration. However, proper hydration is essential to digest food, detoxify kidneys and liver, and remove waste products. Improper hydration may lead to many complications, like joint pain, headache, fatigue, hypertension, and lots more. To avoid such issues, you should undergo Hydrate IV therapy or treatment from a reputed intravenous center in your area. 

Details on Lifeline Hydration Package at IV Clinics 

The lifeline hydration IV drip package consists of the following wellness and preventative supplements-

All-inclusive Care from Hangover 

Hydrate IV treatment recovers from various complications, which may arise from moderate dehydration after consuming alcoholic beverages. These include fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and headache. 

Immunity Booster 

Intravenous solutions hydrate your body to overcome colds and flu. Moreover, you may choose the Myers cocktail to get a few vital nutrients to get up on your feet and boost immunity faster. 

Remedy to Detoxification and Wellness 

Intravenous therapy for lifeline hydration supplies vitamins and other nutrients to detox your body and revive wellness. 

Intense Training, Exercise, and Athletic Competition 

Athletes are often involved in intense training and physical exercise. In this situation, they need IV drip treatments to rejuvenate with thr necessary dosage of preventative vitamins, hydration, and joint or muscle soreness medications. 

Common Uses of Hydrate IV Solutions 

Intravenous nutrition and hydration therapy have multiple uses, which people belonging to every profession should include as a significant part of their regular health and maintenance. A few of the applications include the following- 

Promotes Optimum Health

IV packages address regeneration, inflammation, immunity, and anti-aging problems. It even overcomes nutritional deficiencies to promote optimum health. 

Addresses Inflammation to Heal Injuries Better 

Intravenous therapy addresses inflammation right from its source. In this way, your body will heal from injuries far better and cause less damage to organs from inflammatory reactions to go on inside the body. 

Offers Anti-aging Therapies 

Inflammation may affect the human’s quality of lifethrough pain and diseases while accelerating one’s aging process. Luckily, one can use intravenous medications as effective anti-aging treatments and therapies. These treatment options not only improve one’s physical appearance but also improve psychological health and well-being to provide physical wellness.

In simple words, IV drip and therapy improve human health by increasing energy, improving immunity, allowing detoxification, and reducing pain or inflammation.

Conclusion 

Numerous causes of dehydration, toxicities, and nutritional deficiencies take place in modern lifestyles. In this situation, humans require IV nutrition via Myers Cocktail to avail of the benefits it offers. The cocktail offers vital nutrients in appropriate quantities to boost health conditions and immunity and to deal with anti-aging problems. Moreover, IV clinics may adjust or offer customized intravenous solutions of many types depending on the specific concerns and requirements of a person.

Replenish 360

A Division of Palm Desert Resuscitation Education, LLC

“Renew the body, refresh the mind, and restore performance”

73700 Dinah Shore Drive, Suite 107,

Palm Desert, CA 92211

760-422-3114

www.YourCPRMD.com/Replenish360

replenish360ivtherapy@gmail.com

Shipping Container Guide

 

Shipping Containers are the cargo containers that allow goods to be stored for transport in trucks, trains and boats, making intermodal transport possible.  They are typically used to transport heavy materials or palletized goods.  Shipping Containers are used to protect transported cargo from shock and bad weather conditions, as well as keep storage products intact. They were first used in the 1950s and were initially developed for the purpose of commercial shipping.

Shipping containers are also referred to as, ISO container, conex box, railroad container, intermodal container and certain truck trailers. This industry term refers to the International Standards Organization (ISO), the largest developer of international standards and the organization that developed the standard dimension specifications for steel shipping containers used worldwide.

The design of the ISO standard containers allows for intermodal shipping, which is the movement of containers from one mode of transport to another, like ship, rail, or truck, without the need of having to load and unload, and reload its contents.

Shipping Containers are used to protect transported cargo from shock and bad weather conditions, as well as keep storage products intact. They were first used in the 1950s and were initially developed for the purpose of commercial shipping container transport.

Depending on the type of product that is going to be sent, the Shipping Container can vary in dimension, structure, material, etc. Characteristics of these shipping containers were later standardized, something that expedited transport without the need to load and unload the merchandise along the way.

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There are different types of Shipping Containers for different types of transportation:

Common Types of Shipping Containers

Shipping Containers are another name for the conex boxes most used on the market.  Shipping Containers are typically suitable for any type of dry cargo: pallets, boxes, bags, machines, furniture, etc.

Common types include:

  • Dry Storage Container
  • Refrigerated Container
  • Open top container
  • Flat rack container
  • Open Side Container
  • Tanks Container
  • Ventilated containers
  • Dry Storage Shipping Container

Dry Storage Shipping Containers are your typical standard shipping containers.  Basic construction is made of steel, and hermetically sealed, without cooling or ventilation.  Sizes typically come in 20 ‘, 40’ or 40 ‘High Cube.  The High Cube category facilitates an increase of 13% of the internal cubic capacity and can handle the heaviest loads (coal, tobacco, etc.)

Refrigerated Shipping Container

Reefer Shipping Containers provide a temperature controlled environment. They have a power supply that connects to energy sources during transport. This allows the products to be transported at a constant temperature throughout the journey. They have the possibility to lower temperature from -18 ° to 30 °.  There are 20 and 40 foot models, in addition to the High Cube.

This type of Shipping Container is especially recommended for transporting food or products that need a low storage temperature.

Open Top Shipping Container

Open Top Shipping Container have the same measurements as the standard containers, but are open at the top because they have a removable canvas roof.  These containers facilitate the transport of bulky loads.

Flat Rack Shipping Container

Flat Rack Shipping Containers are like the Open Top, but also lack side walls and even, in some cases, front and rear walls. They are used for atypical loads and pay supplements in the same way as Open Top.

Open Side Shipping Container

Open Side Shipping Containers have the same measurements as standard containers; 20 or 40 feet, with the difference that they have a side opening. This allows for transporting very long merchandise, whose dimensions prevent it from being loaded by the back door.

Tank Shipping Container

Tank Shipping Containers are used for the liquid transport and made to carry dangerous as toxic, corrosive, highly combustible chemicals, as well as oil, milk, beers, wine, mineral water, etc. They have the same dimensions as a Dry Shipping Containers, but their structure is different, as they include a polyethylene tank inside.

Ventilated Shipping Containers

Ventilated Shipping Containers are made for transporting products such as coffee or cocoa beans, which must be ventilated in transit; sometimes these units are called “coffee containers”.

Shipping Container Door Diagram and Troubleshooting

Now we are going to run through the essential parts of a shipping container.

  • For a door to work, you need hinges. Pins hold the shipping container’s hinges together through a barrel.  In certain cases when doors are difficult to open, hinge pins and blades may be seized due to corrosion.  Each door is fitted with 2 to 4 vertical lock rods to enable opening, closing and locking of the doors.
  • The door handle rotates the lockbar to initiate the door opening process by forcing the cams out of their keepers. Each door handle has a door locking handle retainer that slides over the door handle when in locked position.
  • At the end of each lock rod is a cam welded in place which engages with knuckles, also known as cam keepers. The action of engaging the cams to the keepers forms an anti-racking function.  In certain cases, often unfortunately too many, contents of the shipping container may have shifted causing shipping container doors and lockrods to warp. 
  • When opening a shipping container, start with the right hand door first. Swivel the handles, engage the cams and keepers, and twist both door handles.  Closing the doors is just a reverse of this process.
  • The lock box is a steel box welded to the right hand door which overlaps a staple welded to the left hand door. A padlock, normally CISA type 285 66 can then be attached inside the lock box through the staple and is then protected from direct attack, hindering attempts to gain entry to the container.
  • ISO markings and a consolidated data plate allow worldwide intermodal transport and are updated as necessary. Take note that customs authorities in some countries may also have their own container seal regulations as part of their national security.
  • Rubber gaskets are fitted to the container doors during the manufacturing process and prevent water ingress. Door gaskets are designed to present two or more fins against the structure or adjacent door. These are generally flexible but when the gasket is damaged, they may become stiff thus jamming the door closed, or preventing it from being closed.
  1. Doors

Two door leaves are fabricated from two vertical rolled hollow sections and 2 horizontal c section members. The frame is infilled with corrugated steel paneling.

These are normally attached to the rear corner posts each with four drop forged steel hinge blades. The blades allow 270 degree opening which allow the doors to swing back against the container side wall.

(Cargo may shift during transit. Look at the container to make sure that the doors are aligned and level, both top and bottom.  In cases where the container frame is racked and the door gear will not operate correctly.)

  1. Lockbox

The lock box is a steel box welded to the right hand door which overlaps a staple welded to the left hand door. A padlock, normally type CISA type 285 66 can then be attached inside the lock box through the staple and is then protected from direct attack, hindering attempts to gain entry to the container.

  1. Lockrods, cam keepers, handles

Each door is fitted with 2-4 vertical lock rods to enable opening, closing and locking of the doors.

At the end of each lock rod (top and bottom) is a cam welded in place which engages with knuckles, also known as cam keepers.

The action of engaging the cams to the keepers forms an anti-racking function.

(In certain cases, often unfortunately too many, contents of the shipping container may have shifted, or containers even dropped, causing shipping container doors and lockrods to warp)

The door handle rotates the lockbar to initiates the door opening process by forcing the cams out of their keepers.  Each door handle has a door locking handle retainer that slides over the door handle when in locked position.

  1. Rubber gaskets

Rubber gaskets are fitted to the container doors during the manufacturing process and prevent water ingress.

(Door gaskets are designed to present two or more fins against the structure or adjacent door. These are generally flexible but when the gasket is damaged, they may become hard or blocked thus jamming the door closed, or preventing it being closed.)

  1. ISO markings and CSC plate

ISO markings and a consolidated data plate allow worldwide intermodal transport when left in place and updated as necessary.

  1. Hinge pins

Of course for a door to work, you need hinges.

(In certain cases when doors are difficult to open, hinge pins and blade are seized due to corrosion.)

Choosing the Right Company for Buying a Shipping Container

When doing research in finding the right Shipping Container, follow some of these tips:

Research Online

Choose which companies have a good track record of excellence and reputation.  Read reviews and what other customers have to say.

Check for Availability

If you are shipping from various locations, check for availability if containers can be delivered to your required areas.

Check for Best Pricing

If money matters, you can find used container resellers online that might be able to offer half the price on used containers.

Check for Good Customer Service

If you plan to order often, you might want to check for good customer service.  Ask potential container companies a question through email or their online customer service. See how fast they respond.

Check for Warranty

Check with companies to see if they offer any warranties or buy back or trade in plans.

There are millions of Shipping Containers in use around the world, and a lucky few get a second life as repurposed shipping container structures. While they look a bit plain and boxy to the untrained eye, shipping containers play a critical role in our lives, whether embarking on ocean crossings to deliver the goods we use every day or venturing into a second life as a container structure.

Here are Some Fascinating Facts about Shipping Containers

  • Shipping Containers can be safely stacked nine-high.
  • Well-maintained Shipping Containers hold 759, of their original value for 25+ years.
  • There are over 37 million Shipping Containers in use around the world.
  • A Shipping Container floor can hold up 55,000 lb. of goods without warping.
  • Shipping Container flooring is made of 1-1/8” marine grade plywood.
  • Most Shipping Containers are 20 feet or 40-feet long.
  • Shipping Containers are made of 16-gauge corten steel.
  • Common container modifications include: personnel doors, windows flooring, shelving, work stations, insulation, climate control & even restrooms.

Fun Ways to Use Shipping Containers

Shipping Containers are not just used for cargo these days. There are many innovative and imaginative uses you may like to consider.

Here are few ideas of how shipping containers have been used for modern, cost effective buildings.

Homes

The trend to build cost-effective homes from recycled shipping containers started in USA and has reached Australia.

Art Galleries

Architect, Tomokaza Hayakawa designed an art gallery in Japan using two shipping containers stacked on each other.

Drive-Thru Coffee

Starbucks in Washington have used four old shipping containers to create an architect designed drive-thru store.

Cafes

A cafe in Footscray (Melbourne) called Rudimentary has been built using three 40-foot shipping containers.

Polar Stations

India has built a Polar Station in Antarctica using 134 shipping containers. They cover three floors and are well insulated for the weather conditions.

A well-maintained Shipping Container can hold 75% of their original value for 25+ years. Every day, container ships transport goods all over the world on the international seas.

Shipping Container Opening and Closing Tool

Shipping containers often take a beating, traveling around the world, being exposed to freezing conditions and rust due to seawater or when the frost has melted.

During the cold season, and in freezing parts of the world, our shipping container tool can benefit the opening and closing of frozen shipping container doors and hard to open or rusted containers.

Injuries often occur as a result of personnel trying to open and close difficult container doors, and often are the result of inappropriate techniques being used to open them.

To aid in opening and closing shipping container doors, we introduce OPNBar.

A Shipping Container (also known as Intermodal Container, ISO Container,Railroad Container, and certain Truck Trailers)  is a large standardized shipping container, designed and built for intermodal freight transport.   Shipping Containers can be used across different modes of transport.  They can go from ship to rail to truck, without unloading and reloading their cargo.

The metal doors on the shipping containers on these containers are standardized.  Shipping Containers use the same type and style of doors and locking bars, which our tool can be used.

Lengths are as follows: 20′, 40′, 45′, 48′, 50′, 53′. All these containers are globally used to transport cargo. The 53′ length is now, the new the standard length.

Here are some likely reasons a Shipping Container door will not open or close.  Visit https://www.shippingcontainertool.com/what-is-a-shipping-container/ to find out how to overcome some of these issues.

Doors and lockrods may warp or container frame is racked so that the door gear will not operate correctly. This may be caused by cargo shifting during transit. Look at the container to make sure that the doors are aligned and level, both top and bottom.

The hinge pins and blade are seized due to corrosion.

The door gasket has been damaged and is preventing opening. Door gaskets are designed to present two or more fins against the structure or adjacent door. These are generally flexible but when the gasket is damaged, they may become hard or blocked thus jamming the door closed, or preventing it being closed.

Water has become trapped between frozen shipping container doors, particularly relevant to refrigerated cargoes, or containers with moisture releasing cargoes in cold weather.

Achieve your career pretensions with Pukka Nursing Assistant Program

Achieve your career pretensions with Pukka Nursing Assistant Program

No doubt, all the medical professions are noble profession, but after croakers, the nurses play a veritably important part in taking care of the diseased. Just like the nurses help the croakers, the nanny sidekicks are there to support the nurses. They form an important part of the entire healthcare platoon by working under the direct guidance of the registered nursing labor force. They directly take of the cases, promotes comfort practices, collects and maintains record and reports them to their seniors.

Those who have a want to join the healthcare assiduity and do not know from to begin, for them the pukka Nursing Assistant (CNA) program would be an ideal choice. The stylish part is that the Southern California Nursing Academy, Inc. Is participating, promoting and networking their largely- rated nursing adjunct and other healthcare programs which are helping the pupil who ask to start their career in the healthcare and nursing field. The Southern California Nursing Academy offers CNA and other courses, programs, education products, instrument and also guiding and consulting services.

The scholars who are just about to begin their scale of farther studies have to do lot of exploration work for opting the right institute and university. However, they’ve numerous choices, If they’re interested to go for nanny adjunct training program   (NATP) in Southern California. If they want suggestions also we’d suggest them to go for the seminaries and institutes which are accredited by govt. Health departments like the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Training Program Review Unit (TPRU), and assistant and Technician instrument Section (ATCS). When the academe is certified from these departments, the scholars can have a complete faith on them and take the Nursing Assistant School or any other paramedical courses.

The scholars can anticipate important from Southern California Nursing Academy, Inc. They’re there to support, help, aspire and give the CNA programs for the healthcare professional applicants. They will professionally train the scholars with proposition and practical chops on cases. The Southern California Nursing Academy, Inc. Believe that the entry position knowledge is veritably important to start the career. Once you’re into the healthcare assiduity, there is innumerable number of effects to learn. So, their end is to give the scholars with entry position clinical and nursing chops to help them get a good career launch.

How to start with the CNA program?

The scholars who want to enroll themselves for the pukka Nursing Assistant (CNA) program, just need to search CNA programs near me and they would presumably get the asked results. The campaigners for admission should be minimal 16 times old and must have completed advanced secondary examination.

They should be ready for training as they’re going to be trained by a platoon of educated healthcare professionals having advanced medical instruments. Registered medical interpreters, registered nurses, and numerous other healthcare professionals are into furnishing training of CNA program.

The scholars will be learning and getting trained under the supervision of excellent staff, cases and levies and all other professed members who all inclusively form a hard- working platoon.

SOCAL NURSING PREMIER CARE CENTER

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 Palm Desert, CA 92211

-760-332-8083

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What is JTAG?

Introduction

JTAG is an integrated method for testing interconnects on printed circuit boards (PCBs) that are implemented at the integrated circuit (IC) level.  Since its introduction as an industry standard in 1990, JTAG has continuously grown in adoption, popularity, and usefulness—even today, new revisions and supplements to the IEEE Std.-1149.1 standard are being developed and implemented. This document is a brief introduction to the nature and history of JTAG, from its introduction to new extensions in current development.

History of JTAG

In the 1980s, the Joint Test Action Group (JTAG) set out to develop a specification for boundary-scan testing that was standardized in 1990 as the IEEE Std. 1149.1-1990. A few years later in 1993, a new revision to the standard—1149.1a—was introduced to clarify, correct, and enhance the original specification. An additional supplement, 1149.1b, was published in 1994 to add Boundary-Scan Description Language (BSDL) to the standard, paving the way for fast, automated test development and spurring continuous adoption by major electronics producers all over the world. The lessons that were learned became formalized in an update to the core standard in 2001 and IEEE-1149.1-2001 was published.

As new applications of JTAG were discovered, new standards were developed to extend the capabilities of JTAG. Standards such as the IEEE-1149.5 module test and maintenance bus standard in 1995 and the IEEE-1149.4 standard for mixed-signal testing in 1999 were met with low adoption rates and are not widely used at present. The IEEE-1149.6 standard introduced in 2003, on the other hand, began with slow adoption but has since become standard in many ICs as the technology it addressed—high-speed, AC-coupled signals—became a common feature of electronic systems. IEEE-1149.7, published in 2009 to address the need for JTAG in low-pin-count systems, is now standard on many popular microcontrollers.

JTAG Technology

JTAG is commonly referred to as boundary-scan and defined by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) 1149.1, which originally began as an integrated method for testing interconnects on printed circuit boards (PCBs) implemented at the integrated circuit (IC) level. As PCBs grew in complexity and density—a trend that continues today—limitations in the traditional test methods of in-circuit testers (ICTs) and bed of nails fixtures became evident. Packaging formats, specifically Ball Grid Array (BGA, depicted in Figure 1) and other fine pitch components, designed to meet ever-increasing physical space constraints, also led to a loss of physical access to signals.

For more information see this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Netxo6NZ2Ws&ab_channel=CorelisJtag

These new technology developments led to dramatic increases in costs related to designing and building bed of nails fixtures; at the same time, circuit board test coverage also suffered. JTAG/boundary-scan presented an elegant solution to this problem: build functionality into the IC to assist in testing assembled electronic systems.

Today, JTAG is used for everything from testing interconnects and functionality on ICs to programming flash memory of systems deployed in the field and everything in-between. JTAG and its related standards have been and will continue to be extended to address additional challenges in electronic test and manufacturing, including test of 3D ICs and complex, hierarchical systems.

What is JTAG?

Additional standards have also been published to add specific test capabilities. In 2002, the IEEE-1532 standard for in-system configuration of programmable devices was released and is now a common feature of FPGAs and their supporting software systems. IEEE-1581 was developed in 2011 to provide a convenient method of testing interconnects of high-speed memories with slow-speed test vectors; a version of this capability is implemented in some DDR4 memory components. To address the new application of combined capacitive sensing and boundary-scan test, IEEE-1149.8.1 was published in 2012. The extensibility of JTAG has been proven time and again.

More recently, efforts have been made to standardize JTAG access to instruments embedded within ICs. The IEEE-1149.1 standard was updated once more in 2013 for some housekeeping and to add extensions to access these instruments. Just one year later, an alternative standard for accessing these instruments, IEEE-1687, was published. Looking to the future, industry activities to extend JTAG into 3D-IC testing, system-level testing, and high-speed testing are already underway, proving that the versatility and extensibility of JTAG is here to stay.

How Does JTAG Work?

The JTAG/boundary-scan test architecture was originally developed as a method to test interconnects between ICs mounted on a PCB without using physical test probes. Boundary-scan cells created using multiplexer and latch circuits are attached to each pin on the device. These cells, embedded in the device, can capture data from pin or core logic signals as well as force data onto pins. Captured data is serially shifted out through the JTAG Test Access Port (TAP) and can be compared to expected values to determine a pass or fail result. Forced test data is serially shifted into the boundary-scan cells. All of this is controlled from a serial data path called the scan path or scan chain.

Because each pin can be individually controlled, boundary-scan eliminates a large number of test vectors that would normally needed to properly initialize sequential logic. Using JTAG, tens or hundreds of test vectors may do the job that had previously required thousands. Boundary-scan enables shorter test times, higher test coverage, increased diagnostic capability, and lower capital equipment cost.

The principles of interconnect test using boundary-scan components are illustrated in Figure 3. Two boundary-scan compliant devices are connected with four nets. The first device includes four outputs that are driving the four inputs of the other with predefined values. In this case, we assume that the circuit includes two faults: a short fault between Net2 and Net3, and an open fault on Net4. We will also assume that a short between two nets behaves as a wired-AND and an open fault behaves as a stuck-at-1 condition.

To detect and isolate defects, the tester shifts the patterns shown in Figure 3 into the first boundary-scan register and applies these patterns to the inputs of the second device.

Of course, interconnect testing is just one of many uses of JTAG—the aforementioned JTAG TAP has been extended to support additional capabilities including in-system-programming (ISP), in-circuit-emulation (ICE), embedded functional testing, and many more. The standard accounts for the addition of device-specific instructions and registers that can be used to interact with additional IC capabilities. For example, a microprocessor device may have embedded functionality for data download, program execution, or register peek-and-poke activities accessible using JTAG TAP; using the same tools, FPGA and CPLD devices can be erased, configured, read-back, and controlled using JTAG instructions through the IEEE-1532 standard. More recently, embedded IC instrumentation—from instruments that measure voltage and current to devices that can execute high-speed test on the chip—has used the JTAG TAP as the access mechanism, providing new visibility into the IC and further expanding the scope of JTAG testing.The input values captured in the boundary-scan register of the second device are shifted out and compared to the expected values. In this case, the results, underlined and marked in red on Net2, Net3, and Net4, do not match the expected values and the tester tags these nets as faulty. Sophisticated algorithms are used to automatically generate the minimal set of test vectors to detect, isolate, and diagnose faults to specific nets, devices, and pins.

JTAG for Product Life-Cycle Phases and Applications

While JTAG/boundary-scan was originally regarded as a method to test electronic products during the production phase, new developments and applications of the IEEE-1149.1 standard have enabled the use of JTAG in many other product life cycle phases. Boundary-scan technology is commonly applied to product design, prototype debugging, and field service as depicted in Figure 4.

The same test suite used to validate design testability can adapted and utilized for board bring-up, high-volume manufacturing test, troubleshooting and repairs, and even field service and reprogramming. The versatility of JTAG/boundary-scan tools delivers immense value to organizations beyond the production phase.

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